Estate of Denial news clips (4/21/16)

Judge Won’t Order Sumner Redstone Deposition

The Hollywood Reporter

April 14, 2016

Media mogul Sumner Redstone won’t be deposed as part of the legal battle over control of his healthcare, a California judge ruled in a Thursday afternoon hearing.

Judge David J. Cowan waited to decide on the issue until the sides laid out specifically how Redstone would be testifying at trial.

 

Lawyer objects to Onosko motion in cop’s inheritance case (NH)

Seacoastonline.com

April 14, 2016

PORTSMOUTH — Police Commissioner Joe Onosko’s efforts to delay settlement of an estate case, pertaining to a fired cop’s overturned $2.7 million inheritance, have been met by objection from a lawyer representing two of the estate’s largest beneficiaries.

Onosko filed an April 5 motion in the Strafford County probate court, asking for 30 days to review $579,000 in legal bills submitted by attorney David Eby, for his work on the case. Eby represents the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Shriner’s Hospitals for Children, each one-quarter beneficiaries of the estate of the late Geraldine Webber, after smaller beneficiaries and bills are paid. The Portsmouth police and fire departments are also each one-quarter beneficiaries.

 

Who’s Messing With James Brown’s Will?

Daily Beast

April 15, 2016

Is James Brown the most influential American musician of the 20th century? He’s certainly in the conversation along with Louis Armstrong, Bob Dylan, and Michael Jackson. His story—the undeniable musical legacy as well as the catastrophic events following his death in 2006—is brilliantly evoked in James McBride’s riveting new book, Kill ’Em and Leave. McBride, an accomplished musician and award-winning author, is the ideal guide to take us through the intricacies of Brown’s life, his towering musical accomplishments, and the bitter, enraging legal mess that has tied up Brown’s estate. It was Brown’s wish to leave the majority of his fortune—which McBride reports was conservatively estimated at $100 million—to poor children in South Carolina. So far, none of it—not a cent—has reached its intended destination.

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