Heir-raising tale: Billion-dollar Duke twins survived abuse hell

They’re set to inherit up to $1 billion when they turn 21, but the twin teen heirs of tobacco heiress Doris Duke say they were forced to live like slaves as little children — locked in a feces-strewn basement and scalded by boiling baths — at their heroin-addicted dad’s sprawling plantation.

“I never asked to be born into any of this. Sometimes I wish I was never born,’’ 15-year-old Georgia Inman tells Rolling Stone magazine in an interview that hits newsstands today.

Calling her fortune “blood money,’’ Georgia said her crazed father, Walker Inman, Duke’s nephew, was so horrific that she once put a gun to his head in an unsuccessful attempt to end the kids’ misery.

“They. Stuck my brother and I. In hot boiling water in our bath,” Georgia recalled in a faltering voice in the interview.

“It felt like our skin was melting away,” she said, her body shaking from the memory of the abuse she and her brother, Walker Patterson, suffered at the hands of their dad and, allegedly, his fifth wife at the Duke family estate in South Carolina.

The cruel dad — who received an estimated $90,000 monthly inheritance — got custody of the kids in 2000 when they were 2.

He had custody until he died from a meth overdose in 2010.

They now live with their money-hungry ex-stripper mom, Daisha Inman, Walker’s third wife, in a $20,000-a month Utah rental.

Inman is currently locked in a vicious legal battle with executives from Citibank and JPMorgan — who administer the twins’ hefty trust funds — in Manhattan Surrogate’s Court over her handling of their dough.

Titled “Poorest Rich Kids in the World,’’ the explosive article includes horrified recollections from employees who worked at Walker’s estates, including a rented, 10,000-square-foot mansion, dubbed Outlaw Acres, in Wyoming.

“Walker made them stay down in the basement all the time,” wrote plantation caretaker Vick “Butch’’ Deer in an affidavit related to a onetime lawsuit over damage at the property.

“The basement was covered in feces, and it was smeared all over, and it smelled terrible. It was so bad that I wouldn’t leave a dog in that condition.”

Several others said the kids were locked in their room each night, and, according to a former nanny, “There was food strewn across the floor and a foul smell from where the kids had been relieving themselves in a corner.”

The article opens with a harrowing tale of Walker’s fifth wife, Daralee, driving the kids to school one morning — already allegedly wasted at 7:30 a.m. — and crashing into a tree.

The kids had a pet lion cub and brought diamonds to school for show-and-tell, but they looked malnourished with dark circles under their eyes to the stream of nannies who cared for them.

And they’re still living a cloistered life. Georgia told the magazine that she’d never heard of the childhood game Musical Chairs, and Walker Patterson’s fondest memory of Pop was when he intentionally set off a tear-gas grenade in the house as part of a whacked-out safety lesson.

Three years from adulthood, they both still believe in Santa Claus. “Dear Santa, I know I haven’t been good, but if you do come all I want is to say hi to you in person,” Patterson recently wrote to the mythical character, according to Rolling Stone, in the shaky handwriting of a first-grader.

Georgia claims she once spotted the bearded man in the flesh, but it’s more likely the vision was an apparition of her late father, who’s haunted her since his untimely passing.

“I think he’s here,” she whispered during the magazine interview, gesturing to an empty chair in her new Utah home.

The interview poses the obvious question: Why didn’t the authorities intervene to rescue these poor little rich kids?

Wyoming law-enforcement never filed charges against the Inmans, who lavished local staff with exorbitant salaries and benefits.

When Walker brought his family to the South Carolina plantation, the Department of Social Services logged three reports about the crazy clan.

In one incident, police were called to a restaurant after Georgia’s dad slapped her so hard, fellow diners feared for her life.

The troubled duo was sent to a mental hospital for three months of recovery from a childhood of trauma.

And they’ve yet to fully heal. Both teens have recently contemplated suicide and suffered from anorexia.

Daisha’s plans for her kids’ future? Pairing them up with fellow fatherless children with a similar amount of baggage.

“She’s working on getting the twins together with Michael Jackson’s kids, with whom she thinks they’d have tons in common,” the article concludes.

Attribution:

Heir-raising tale: Billion-dollar Duke twins survived abuse hell
Julia Marsh
August 2, 2013
New York Post
http://www.nypost.com/p/news/national/heir_raising_tale_fcinJ5kPKSM2dggWt4clvM

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