From Florida (via Ohio)

EDITOR’S NOTE:   Updated links to Tom Fields’ information are available on the EoD Links and Sources page.

Thank you for letting me know that Helen sent you my e-mail address and said I had done some good work exposing probate corruption.  I very much appreciate knowing that you might be interested in seeing my info and learning more about my other activities/efforts.

What I mostly have to offer is:  (1) evidence, and (2) reasonable proposals for providing safeguards against the kinds of negligence and frauds which I and others have experienced.

MY EVIDENCE proves that my father was taken advantage of on the day he died in a Florida hospital, while he was being administered morphine under a Do Not Resuscitate order that was started earlier that same day as a result of his stomach rupturing …  The court ignored every expression of his wishes made during the preceding years, months, days, hours and even minutes.  It ignored his Will, his Trust, and his prenuptial agreement.  It also ignored the testimony of two lawyers to whom he had expressed “extreme distrust” for his stepdaughter, the lawyer who orchestrated the fraud. It ignored the conflict between two financial documents that my father signed while in that condition.  It fraudulently prevented me from participating in the trial which I initiated.

My presentation of the evidence is unique, since I present and comment upon not only my father’s estate-related documents (original and contested) but also the sworn testimony of the defendant, doctors, lawyers and others intimately involved in the case.  Because the “total” picture is conveyed surprisingly well by the testimony of the defendant, I sometimes recommend this testimony,  or at least the points which I singled out on the webpage titled “What to Look For and How to Find It ” (http://members.aol.com/tvfields/Shirley_Depo/Frameset000.htm) as a good place to begin to learn the facts of my case.  Other good starting points are (1) http://home.roadrunner.com/~tvfields/ILF_Links/Frameset001.htm and (2) http://home.roadrunner.com/~tvfields/Directory.htm.

THREE PROPOSALS that I advocate are

#1:
Amend the Older Americans Act so as to address deficiencies in the handling of complaints by state and area agencies on aging.

#2:
Establish interview protocols and standards for the purpose of assessing and responding to elder abuse and neglect.  Details are presented in the Ohio Physicians Elder Abuse Prevention Project report.

#3:
Adopt, amend and extend Ohio Revised Code 2107.081 – 2107.085 so as to provide individuals the means they need to protect themselves and their heirs against the opportunists who would take advantage of them when they are most vulnerable to such exploitation.  Details are presented in a handout which was distributed in 2005 to delegates to the White House Conference on Aging.

These safeguards complement one another.  They are all needed.  I believe #3 has the potential to be the most reliable safeguard.  #2 is needed when #3 has not been exercised or is not applicable.  #1 addresses a variety of needs that are not addressed by #s 2 and 3.

I have spent 15 years advocating such safeguards.  During these 15 years, I have communicated with numerous people, including some officials who have been responsive.  If I am correct in understanding that you are from Texas, then you might be interested in correspondences which I have exchanged with Texans, especially a series of about a dozen correspondences which I exchanged with a representative (Stephanie Tabone?) of the Texas Nurses Association regarding a legislative proposal which I finalized in 1994 and which was sponsored in 1996 by Ohio’s Senate Minority Leader.  That proposal, had it not been killed in committee, would have simply provided everyone in Ohio the right to declare in advance that they demand the court void by summary judgement any financial document which they would sign while being administered morphine under a Do Not Resuscitate order unless whatever safeguards they stipulate in their declaration are honored so as to protect themselves and their heirs under such circumstances.  Why shouldn’t you have such a right, either in its original form or in the form presented in 2005 to delegates to the White House Conference on Aging?

From what I know of your website http://www.estateofdenial.com/, I expect that this material might interest you personally.

Sincerely,

Tom Fields
6860 Georgetown Drive
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440/255-7693

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